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Tuesday, 02 August 2022 00:00

The feet are considered to be the foundation of the body. Their function is to provide stability and balance to the body, in addition to making it possible to stand, walk and run. Children’s feet grow rapidly to keep up with the rest of their bodies, and will grow faster during puberty. As the child approaches adulthood, the bones in the feet become larger, and will continue to grow until the age of approximately twenty. There are 26 bones in each foot, and the bones in both feet add up to one quarter of the bones in the body. An interesting fact is the feet have the most sweat glands per square centimeter, and 125,000 of them are located on each sole. Additionally, the feet have 8000 nerve endings, and this can contribute to the feet being one of the most ticklish areas of the body. Research has indicated that toenails grow slower than fingernails, and a toenail can take 12 to 18 months to fully grow. If you would like to know more about foot structure, and interesting information about the feet, please consult with a podiatrist. 

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics

  • Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
  • In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Union, NJ and the Upper East Side, Manhattan . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about The Importance of Biomechanics in Podiatry
Tuesday, 26 July 2022 00:00

Hairdressers, restaurant line cooks and servers, teachers, and warehouse workers all have one thing in common—they spend a great part of their workday standing on their feet. This prolonged activity can result in chronic pain and discomfort in the feet, legs, and back. The first line of defense against foot pain caused from prolonged standing is proper footwear. Experts suggest shoes with a flatter heel that offer ample arch support. If you stand on hard surfaces, extra cushioning should be considered while choosing your shoes. Insoles or custom orthotics may be necessary to correct any ongoing conditions that may contribute to pain or fatigue. Shoes that breathe can help to prevent infections that thrive in moist environments. High heels should be avoided. It is also recommended that regular stretching exercises help blood circulate to the feet. Losing weight can reduce the pressure felt in the feet and legs, and it can help to keep joints healthy. Paying attention to your posture can aid in distributing your weight evenly and avoiding future leg and back problems. And finally, rest your feet when you can—taking breaks at work when possible and elevating them at home. If your foot pain becomes persistent, even when at rest, it is a good idea to consult a podiatrist for guidance and further treatment options. 


 

While working on the feet, it is important to take the proper care of them. For more information about working on your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Podiatry. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Working on Your Feet

Standing on your feet for long periods of time can cause stress and pain in your feet. Your whole body may experience change in terms of posture, back pain, bunions, callouses and or plantar warts. There are ways to avoid these conditions with proper foot care, smart choices and correct posture.

Positive Changes

Negative heeled shoe – Choosing this shoe type places the heel slightly lower than the ball of the foot. These are great for overall foot health. Find shoes that fit you correctly.

Go barefoot – Our feet were not designed to be enclosed for all hours of the day. Try to periodically expose your feet to air.

Eliminate Pain

Foot Exercises – Performing simple exercises, incorporating yoga and doing stretches are beneficial. This will allow increased blood flow to the area and muscles of the foot.

Achilles tendon – Stretching the foot out flat on the floor will relax the calf muscles and tendon. These exercises can be performed almost anywhere. Make sure you add these exercises to your daily regimen. 

With a little bit of this information and knowing more about foot health, you will notice changes. Foot stretches and proper footwear will help with pain and prevent further issues.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Union, NJ and the Upper East Side, Manhattan . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Working on Your Feet
Thursday, 21 July 2022 00:00

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Tuesday, 19 July 2022 00:00

About 6.5 million people in the United States over the age of 40 have peripheral artery disease (PAD). It is a blockage in the arteries that supply blood to the extremities, but the condition is more common in the feet and lower limbs. Risk factors for peripheral artery disease include smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and high cholesterol. People over 60 are at further risk. The most common symptom of PAD is pain in the legs while active, but that subsides after resting. Sores in the legs or feet that don’t heal and cold or numb toes are other symptoms as well. If you believe you may have PAD, please consult a podiatrist for an examination and testing.  

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Advanced Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Union, NJ and the Upper East Side, Manhattan . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
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